Register :: Login 
   
 December 19, 2014  
 Departments A-FEmergency Management   
Plans / Documents Minimize

Special Medical Needs?  The Functional Needs Registry is made up of residents who may require transportation and medical assistance and have no other resources such as family or friends who can help them if they must evacuate when a hurricane is threatening our area. Residents must apply and then qualify to be on the Registry. In the event of an evacuation, local hospitals will not accept Functional or Medical needs citizens.  Therefore, if residents do not register, they will need  to make their own plans. To apply, residents should call the Effingham County Health Department at 912-754-7623.  The application can also be found here: Application  Completed applications must be mailed to the Effingham County Health Department at P.O. Box 350 Springfield, GA 31329.   You can see their 30-second public service announcement here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASd9OvkGVkE

PREPAREDNESS  PLANS

Emergency Management Ordinance  EEMA

Emergency Evacuation Plan 
EVAC

Debris Management Plan   Debris Plan

Emergency Operations Plan   EOP

Warming / Cooling Station Policy  WCSOP

Public Awareness and Education Plan  PAEP

Volunteer and Donations Management Plan  
VDMP

Mass Fatality Mortuary Plan  MFMP

2013 Hazard Mitigation Plan *Document*

Emergency Operations Center Activation Policy  EOC

Interested in Volunteering for the Effingham Emergency Management Agency?  Just fill out the Volunteer Application and turn bring it in!  Application

Re-Entry Pass Application 2011-2015 Re-entry Pass APPLICATION.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 
Develop a Communications Plan Minimize

Your family may not be together when disaster strikes. Make a plan today. Know how you'll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that's familiar and easy to find. Address the unique needs of petsolder loved ones and family members with special needs in your plan.

Download and fill out our Family Emergency Plan or create a Customized Plan for you and your family now.

Family Preparedness:  Is everyone ready?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=n0pg8183shU 

 
Is your Business Ready? Minimize

How quickly your company can get back to business after a natural or man-made disaster depends on emergency planning executed today.

Effingham’s businesses form the backbone of the county’s economy. If businesses are ready to survive and recover, our economy is more secure. A commitment to planning today will help support employees, customers and the community. It also protects your business investment and gives your company a better chance for survival.

We can help! Contact EEMA about our Business Continuity Program and Download the Ready Your Business Guide today.

View a transcript of this video here.

When you consider Georgia’s history of hurricanes, tornadoes, flooding and ice storms along with the threat of pandemic flu, preparedness becomes an even more critical issue. Though each situation is unique, any organization can be better prepared if it plans carefully, puts emergency procedures in place, and practices for emergencies of all kinds.

Preparing makes good business sense. Get ready Effingham.

Resources in Georgia

Georgia offers several organizations that can help your business.

 
Make Your Own Ready Kit! Minimize

Make your own Ready kit with the items on the checklist below. Most of the items are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Headed to the store? Download a printable version to take with you. Once you take a look at the basic items, consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies for petsseniors or family members with special needs. Add those items to your kit and start packing it today.

Recommended Items

  • Water. One gallon per person per day, for at least 3 days, for drinking and hygiene
  • Food. At least a 3-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Can opener. For food, if kit contains canned food
  • Radio. Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert, and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle. To signal for help
  • Face mask. To help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter in place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties. For personal hygiene
  • Wrench or pliers. To turn off utilities
  • Local maps
Additional Items
  • Prescription medications and glasses
  • Infant formula and diapers
  • Pet food, extra water, pet supplies, toys and vaccination forms.
  • Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container
  • Cash or traveler’s checks and change
  • Emergency reference material such as a first aid book or information from Ready America
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person. Consider adding bedding in cold weather.
  • Complete change of clothing. Include a long sleeved shirt, long pants and sturdy shoes. Consider adding clothing in cold weather.  
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Feminine supplies and personal hygiene items
  • Mess kits, paper cups, plates, plastic utensils, paper towels
  • Paper and pencil
  • Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children.

For a list of community preparedness resources, view our Online Toolkit.

Make your own Ready kit with the items on the checklist below. Most of the items are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Headed to the store? Download a printable version to take with you. Once you take a look at the basic items, consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies for pets, seniors or family members with special needs. Add those items to your kit and start packing it today. Download the Ready Georgia mobile app to have this checklist with you all the time.

Or, for a customized emergency plan that will include a detailed checklist with items that are specific to you and your family’s needs, as well as a communications plan to help you reconnect after an emergency, create a user profile now.

Recommended Items

  • Water. One gallon per person per day, for at least 3 days, for drinking and hygiene
  • Food. At least a 3-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Can opener. For food, if kit contains canned food
  • Radio. Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert, and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle. To signal for help
  • Face mask. To help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter in place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties. For personal hygiene
  • Wrench or pliers. To turn off utilities
  • Local maps
Additional Items
  • Prescription medications and glasses
  • Infant formula and diapers
  • Pet food, extra water, pet supplies, toys and vaccination forms.
  • Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container
  • Cash or traveler’s checks and change
  • Emergency reference material such as a first aid book or information from Ready America
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person. Consider adding bedding in cold weather.
  • Complete change of clothing. Include a long sleeved shirt, long pants and sturdy shoes. Consider adding clothing in cold weather.
  • Household chlorine bleach and medicine dropper
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Feminine supplies and personal hygiene items
  • Mess kits, paper cups, plates, plastic utensils, paper towels
  • Paper and pencil
  • Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children.

For a list of community preparedness resources, view our Online Toolkit.

- See more at: http://www.ready.ga.gov/Prepare#sthash.zwxXmkl8.dpuf
 
Get Ready Kids! Minimize

Calling all kids! Would you know how to help your family if there was an emergency in your community? Effingham faces many types of natural and manmade disasters including hurricanes, tornadoes, severe storms, wildfires and floods. Emergencies can happen quickly and without warning, so it’s important to prepare now. Keep reading below to find fun games, tips and activities that will help you and your family get ready for the unexpected. Don’t be scared. Be prepared!

Check out what these kids have to say about being prepared

A transcript for this video can be found here: Kids Get Ready: Transcript for the Hearing Impaired.

Teacher and Parent Toolkit

Teacher and Parent Toolkit contains information, ideas and materials to help encourage children (and their families) to prepare for the unexpected.

Fun & Games

Hey kids! Test your Ready IQ, play games with Rex the mountain lion and check out fun activities to get you and your family prepared

Invite Rex

Rex, a strong and confident mountain lion who encourages children to help their families prepare, is the mascot of the Ready campaign. Find out how you can invite Rex to your event.

 
National Weather Service Minimize

Effingham Emergency Management has proudly partnered with the National Weather Service, you may visit their website at www.weather.gov

NWS provides a national infrastructure to gather and process data worldwide.  Each year, NWS collects some 76 billion observations and issues approximately 1.5 million forecasts and 50,000 warnings.  The NWS Office of Services produces outreach materials to help you prepare for weather emergencies. Most publications are only available online; no printed copies are available. These publications say DOWNLOAD. You can order printed copies of SOME of the publications from

your local NWS Office, the NOAA Education Outreach Center, or the American Red Cross. There is no charge for any of the publications. You need a free copy of Abobe reader to view pdf files.

 
Suggestions? Minimize

The Effingham Emergency Management Agency is always trying to make this website better, so we would love to hear any suggestions you may have.  Please contact us at eema@effinghamcounty.org or at 912-754-8200.  We appreciate your partnership!

 
Interested in Homeowners Insurance? Minimize
Researchers with Reviews.com work to develop unbiased, data-driven reviews of products and services in partnership with an industry expert who adds deep knowledge and years of experience to our analysis and commentary. They’ve worked with many organizations – including professional associations, chambers of commerce, universities, and city governments – to deliver their free information resources to local communities.  You can take a look at their work here: Homeowners Insurance Reviews <http://www.reviews.com/homeowners-insurance/>

Effingham County does not endorse any particular company.
 
Announcements Minimize
 
Emergency Management Agency - Public Safety Minimize



 
Edwin Myrick, Director
601 N. Laurel Street
Springfield, GA. 31329
Office - 912.754.8200
EOC -   912.754.8205
eema@effinghamcounty.org
SMS Text Alerts:
Text
follow effinghamema to 40404 to sign up!

  
 
Emergency Management - Stay Informed! Minimize
Emergency Management is a combination of your local, state and federal governments working together in partnership with local volunteers and businesses, to mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from all hazards that affect a jurisdiction.

The Effingham County Emergency Management Agency is the local agency with the responsibility of coordination and mitigation, preparedness, and response and recovery efforts to protect the lives and property of the citizens of Effingham County.

There are many natural hazards that may impact the communities in Effingham County. These include hurricanes, tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, lightning, floods, winter storms and wild fires. These are dangerous and often unpredictable events. It is very important that citizens know the safety precautions to take before an emergency and what actions to take during an emergency, whether natural or caused by man. In addition to the many natural hazards that may impact the county, there are other man-made and technological hazards that pose an equal, if not greater, threat to the citizens.

Natural and man-made disasters can strike at any time such as ice storms, wildfires, floods and more. This section helps you learn how to plan, prepare and stay informed when you need it most.

Stay Weather Aware

Advance warning is the most powerful preparedness tool for severe weather. Every family should have one or more methods for receiving severe weather alerts, and at least one of these should have an audible alert to wake you in case the alert comes in the middle of the night.

Sign up for SMS Text alerts through the Effingham Emergency Management Agency, text the words     follow  EffinghamEMA      to the number   40404   to receive important information that impacts Effingham County.

Get Ready for Hurricanes

In September 1999, Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina experienced the largest evacuation effort in American history in the face of Hurricane Floyd. An estimated 3 million people took to the highways to flee Floyd’s wrath, jamming interstates in search of safety and shelter.

As a coastal state, Georgia is particularly at risk for hurricanes. Storms that form in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico have the potential to affect our state. Every resident should plan what to do in the event of an evacuation. Review the tips below or check out the last three minutes of this American Sign Language video that provides ways to prepare for hurricanes.

        Prepare for Hurricanes
  • Get a kit of emergency supplies and prepare a portable Ready kit in case you have to evacuate.
  • Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a hurricane. A hurricane watch means a hurricane is possible in your area. Be prepared to evacuate. A hurricane warning means a hurricane is expected in your area. If local authorities advise you to evacuate, leave immediately.
  • Prepare to secure your property.
  • Cover all of your home's windows with pre-cut ply wood or hurricane shutters to protect your windows from high winds.
  • Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.
  • Keep all trees and shrubs well trimmed.
  • If you have a car, fill the gas tank in case you have to evacuate.
        Plan to Evacuate
  • Plan how you will leave and where you will go if you are advised to evacuate.
    • Information on Georgia evacuation routes may be found at Georgia Navigator. Download the Georgia Department of Transportation's Hurricane Season Safety Information brochure and print a copy for your evacuation Ready kit. Use it as a reference for traffic procedures and information in the event of an evacuation.
  • Identify several places you could go in an emergency: a friend's home in another town or a motel. For more information about public shelters in your community, contact our office at 912-754-8200.
  • Be familiar with alternate routes and other means of transportation out of your area.
  • If you are not able to evacuate, stay indoors away from all windows. Take shelter in an interior room with no windows if possible. Be aware that there may be a sudden lull in the storm as the eye of the hurricane moves over. Stay in your shelter until local authorities say it is safe.

Get Ready for Thunderstorms and Lightning

All thunderstorms are dangerous because they can produce strong winds, lightning, tornadoes, hail and flash flooding. The typical thunderstorm is 15 miles in diameter and lasts an average of 30 minutes.

Effingham's greatest threats from severe thunderstorms are damaging straight-line winds and large hail. Straight-line winds can reach speeds in excess of 100 mph and produce damage similar to a tornado. These winds occur about 19 days per year in Georgia and are most common in the spring and summer months, peaking in July.

Lightning is a deadly by-product of thunderstorms, occurring mostly during the warmer months of June through September. Lightning kills an average of 100 people a year throughout the United States. Protect yourself and your family by getting prepared today. You can find an American Sign Language video here with the steps to get ready for threats associated with thunderstorms and lightning.

        Prepare for Thunderstorms and Lightning
  • Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a thunderstorm hazard, including understanding the difference between a severe thunderstorm watch and a severe thunderstorm warning.
    • A thunderstorm watch means there is a possibility of a thunderstorm in your area.
    • A thunderstorm warning means a thunderstorm is occurring or will likely occur soon. If you are advised to take shelter, do so immediately.
  • Remove dead or rotting trees and branches that could fall and cause injury or damage during a severe thunderstorm.
  • Remember the 30/30 lightning safety rule: Go indoors if, after seeing lightning, you cannot count to 30 before hearing thunder. Stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder.

Get Ready for Extreme Heat

Temperatures that hover 10 degrees or more above the average high temperature for the region and last for several weeks are defined as extreme heat. Heat kills by taxing the human body beyond its abilities.

In Effingham, it is not unusual for temperatures to soar into the 90s. In a normal year, approximately 175 Americans succumb to the demands of summer heat. Only the cold of winter – not lightning, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, or earthquakes – takes a greater toll. Humid or muggy conditions can add to the discomfort of high temperatures. A heat wave combined with a drought is a very dangerous situation.

Stay cool under pressure and in Effingham's heat by becoming familiar with the three steps to emergency preparedness - prepare, plan and stay informed. Learn more about getting ready for extreme heat by viewing an American Sign Language video on heat related safety, or read the following tips:

        Prepare for Extreme Heat
  • Check to see if your home's cooling system is working properly.
  • Make sure your home is well insulated and that you have weather stripping around your doors and window sills to keep the cool air inside.
  • Install window air conditioners snugly; insulate if necessary.
  • Check air-conditioning ducts for proper insulation.
  • Install temporary window reflectors (for use between windows and drapes), such as aluminum foil-covered cardboard, to reflect heat back outside, and weather-strip doors and sills to keep cool air in.
  • Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun with drapes, shades, awnings, or louvers. (Outdoor awnings or louvers can reduce the heat that enters a home by up to 80 percent.)
  • Keep storm windows up all year.
        Plan to Slow Down
  • Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.
  • Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.
  • Spend more time in air-conditioned places. Air conditioning in homes and other buildings markedly reduces danger from the heat. If you cannot afford an air conditioner, spending some time each day (during hot weather) in an air-conditioned environment will provide some protection. Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
  • Drink plenty of water. People with epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.
  • Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible.
  • Protect face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.
  • Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.
  • Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.

Get Ready for House Fires

Each year, household fires cause more than 4,000 Americans deaths and more than 25,000 injuries. Many residential fire-related deaths remain preventable and continue to pose a significant public health problem.

        Prepare
        Install Smoke Alarms
  • Properly working smoke alarms decrease your chances of dying in a fire by half.
  • Place smoke alarms on every level of your residence. Place them outside bedrooms on the ceiling or high on the wall (4 to 12 inches from ceiling), at the top of open stairways, or at the bottom of enclosed stairs and near (but not in) the kitchen.
  • Test and clean smoke alarms once a month and replace batteries at least once a year when you change your clocks back to Standard Time each Fall. Replace smoke alarms once every 10 years.
        Plan Your Escape
  • Review escape routes with your family. Practice escaping from each room.
  • Make sure windows are not nailed or painted shut. Make sure security gratings on windows have a fire safety opening feature so they can be easily opened from the inside.
  • Consider escape ladders if your residence has more than one level, and ensure that burglar bars and other antitheft mechanisms that block outside window entry are easily opened from the inside.
  • Teach family members to stay low to the floor when escaping from a fire.
        To escape a fire, you should:
  • Check closed doors for heat before you open them.
  • If you are escaping through a closed door, use the back of your hand to feel the top of the door, the doorknob, and the crack between the door and door frame before you open it.
  • Never use the palm of your hand or fingers to test for heat - burning those areas could impair your ability to escape a fire (i.e., ladders and crawling).
    • Hot Door
      Do not open. Escape through a window. If you cannot escape, hang a white or light-colored sheet outside the window, alerting fire fighters to your presence.
    • Cool Door
      Open slowly and ensure fire and/or smoke is not blocking your escape route. If your escape route is blocked, shut the door immediately and use an alternate escape route, such as a window. If clear, leave immediately through the door and close it behind you. Be prepared to crawl. Smoke and heat rise. The air is clearer and cooler near the floor.
  • Crawl low under any smoke to your exit - heavy smoke and poisonous gases collect first along the ceiling.
  • Close doors behind you as you escape to delay the spread of the fire.
  • Stay out once you are safely out. Do not reenter. Call 9-1-1.
Preventing Fires
        Cooking
  • Cooking is the leading cause of home fires in the U.S. It is also the leading cause of fire injuries.
  • Never leave cooking unattended.
  • Always wear short, tight-fitting sleeves when cooking.
  • Keep towels, pot holders and curtains away from flames and heating elements.
  • Clean cooking surfaces regularly to prevent grease buildup which can ignite.
  • If a fire breaks out while cooking, put a lid on the pan to smother it.
  • Never throw water on a grease fire.
  • Heat oil gradually to avoid burns from spattering grease.
  • Use extra caution when preparing deep-fried foods.
  • Never use the oven to heat your home.
  • Double-check the kitchen before you go to bed or leave the house. Make sure all small appliances are turned off.
        Flammable Items
  • Never use gasoline, benzine, naptha, or similar flammable liquids indoors.
  • Store flammable liquids in approved containers in well-ventilated storage areas.
  • Never smoke near flammable liquids.
  • Discard all rags or materials that have been soaked in flammable liquids after you have used them. Safely discard them outdoors in a metal container.
  • Insulate chimneys and place spark arresters on top. The chimney should be at least three feet higher than the roof. Remove branches hanging above and around the chimney.
        Heating Sources
  • Be careful when using alternative heating sources.
  • Check with your local fire department on the legality of using kerosene heaters in your community. Be sure to fill kerosene heaters outside, and be sure they have cooled.
  • Place heaters at least three feet away from flammable materials.
  • Use only the type of fuel designated for your unit and follow manufacturer's instructions.
  • Store ashes in a metal container outside and away from your residence.
  • Keep open flames away from walls, furniture, drapery, and flammable items.
  • Keep a screen in front of the fireplace.
  • Have heating units inspected and cleaned annually by a certified specialist.
        Matches and Smoking
  • Keep matches and lighters up high, away from children, and, if possible, in a locked cabinet.
  • Never smoke in bed or when drowsy or medicated.
  • Provide smokers with deep, sturdy ashtrays.
  • Douse cigarette and cigar butts with water before disposal.
        Electrical Wiring
  • Have the electrical wiring in your residence checked by an electrician.
  • Inspect extension cords for frayed or exposed wires or loose plugs.
  • Make sure outlets have cover plates and no exposed wiring.
  • Make sure wiring does not run under rugs, over nails, or across high-traffic areas.
  • Do not overload extension cords or outlets.
  • Make sure insulation does not touch bare electrical wiring.

Get Ready for Tornado Season

Tornadoes are nature's most violent storms. They can appear without warning and be invisible until dust and debris are picked up or a funnel cloud appears. Be prepared to act quickly. Planning and practicing specifically how and where you take shelter is a matter of survival. Tornadoes can occur at any time of the year, making advance preparation vitally important.

        Prepare for a Tornado
  • Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a tornado hazard.
    • A tornado watch means a tornado is possible in your area.
    • A tornado warning means a tornado has been spotted in your area, and you need to take shelter immediately.
  • Determine in advance where you will take shelter in case of a tornado warning. Storm cellars or basements provide the best protection.
  • If underground shelter is not available, go into an interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.
  • In a high-rise building, go to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.
  • Stay away from windows, doors and outside walls. Go to the center of the room. Stay away from corners because they attract debris.
  • A vehicle, trailer or mobile home does not provide good protection. Plan to go quickly to a building with a strong foundation, if possible.
  • If shelter is not available, lie flat in a ditch or other low-lying area. Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low, flat location.

 
 Copyright 2008 by Effingham County, Georgia   Terms Of Use  Privacy Statement